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A room without books is a body without soul.

This blog is run by Maggie and Taylor, two impressively dorky, book-obsessed girls who drool over gorgeous libraries and journals.

We post bookish pictures that we fall in love with and reviews of books we read.

We take no credit for any pictures we post unless otherwise noted.

Literary Travel Posts

Maggie's bookshelf: currently-reading

The End of the Affair
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tagged: currently-reading

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lecharmaine:

March Book Challenge: Day 13 - Fandom
Everything and all things Wicked/Wizard of Oz related.

lecharmaine:

March Book Challenge: Day 13 - Fandom

Everything and all things Wicked/Wizard of Oz related.

(via wenchingwithshakespeare)




gobookyourself:

The Book Thief by Markus Zusak (Part 1)

You love The Book Thief so much we’re doing two posts! Here’s the first:

Code Name Verity by Elizabeth Wein for a moving wartime friendship

Stay Where You Are and Then Leave by John Boyne for a child trying to make sense of war

The Shadow of the Wind by Carlos Ruiz Zafon for a story where books hold the answer

Extremely Loud and Incredibly Close by Jonathan Safran Foer for hope against the odds

(for minivinnie, phantasticdanosaur, shadowofemirates)

(via thesecretbooksociety)



The problem that needs to be fixed is not kick all the girls out of YA, it’s teach boys that stories featuring female protagonists or written by female authors also apply to them. Boys fall in love. Boys want to be important. Boys have hopes and fears and dreams and ambitions. What boys also have is a sexist society in which they are belittled for “liking girl stuff.” Male is neutral, female is specific.

I heard someone mention that Sarah Rees Brennan’s THE DEMON’S LEXICON would be great for boys, but they’d never read it with that cover. Friends, then the problem is NOT with the book. It’s with the society that’s raising that boy. It’s with the community who inculcated that boy with the idea that he can’t read a book with an attractive guy on the cover.

Here’s how we solve the OMG SO MANY GIRLS IN YA problem: quit treating women like secondary appendages. Quit treating women’s art like it’s a niche, novelty creation only for girls. Quit teaching boys to fear the feminine, quit insisting that it’s a hardship for men to have to relate to anything that doesn’t specifically cater to them.

Because if I can watch Raiders of the Lost Ark and want to grow up to be an archaeologist, there’s no reason at all that a boy shouldn’t be able to read THE DEMON’S LEXICON with its cover on. My friends, sexism doesn’t just hurt women, and our young men’s abysmal rate of attraction to literacy is the proof of it.

If you want to fix the male literary crisis, here’s your solution:

Become a feminist.


The Problem is Not the Books, Saundra Mitchell (via silverstags)

(via probablyfiction)

53,048 notes
Tagged as: important,


the-library-and-step-on-it:

MY HOME LIBRARY:

My favourite female writer.

…Yeah, I have no excuse for this one.



bookriot:

rachelfershleiser:

authorstalker:

In need of a Monday pick-me-up? Take 10 minutes and watch Rachel Fershleiser’s TEDx talk, “Why I heart the Bookternet" and I guarantee you’ll be full of optimism and sunshine. 

1. That dress, those tights.

2. How can I achieve this level of public speaking excellence? 

———————

Aw thanks! Please, Pollyanna out with me on the great stuff authors, bookstores, and publishers are doing to embrace internet communities.

The brilliant and beautiful Rachel Fershleiser on why the bookternet is rad. Yes to all of these things.


(via eveofspring)




allyouaretomeisdeadskin:

seriously such a great idea

(Source: alethiosaur, via noblehouseof-slytherin)


books0977:

Ava Gardner reading a book with a red cover.
Gardner’s early education was sketchy; by 1945, she had read two books, the Bible and “Gone with the Wind.” In later life, she more than made up for this lack by continual self-education.

books0977:

Ava Gardner reading a book with a red cover.

Gardner’s early education was sketchy; by 1945, she had read two books, the Bible and “Gone with the Wind.” In later life, she more than made up for this lack by continual self-education.

(via womenreading)




jeanpaulfarte:

in stories featuring aliens, they’re always like “on my planet this never happens!” or “in my culture, this differs from your human culture.” and that’s neat and all because i like worldbuilding and all that jazz but wouldn’t it be fun if they just. couldn’t do that?

i want…

(via oh-so-pleasant)



Sunday Afternoon by Pascale C.

Sunday Afternoon by Pascale C.

(Source: bookporn)





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